V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along: Index of Posts

Vogue Patterns V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along. Index of posts on the McCall Pattern Company blog.

Here’s where to find all the posts on the Vogue Patterns V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along:

Pinterest board

Flickr group

Vogue Patterns V1467 pattern

Thanks for participating in our third sew along! We’ll keep these posts up, so don’t worry if you haven’t started your pea coat yet. Don’t forget to use the hashtag #v1467sewalong when you share your pea coat and its construction on social media.

Our next sew along will be in the spring, and we’ll do something a little easier so we can get more beginning sewers involved. Suggestions for what to sew are welcome!

Rachel (House of Pinheiro) wearing her V1467 pea coat.
V1467 Sew Along co-host Rachel of House of Pinheiro in her checked version.
Lori (Girls in the Garden) wearing her V1467 pea coat.
Lori of Girls in the Garden wearing her navy wool version of V1467.

Finished! Our V1467 Pea Coat is Finally Done

Vogue Patterns V1467 pea coat as made by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company for the Fall 2015 Sew Along.

My pea coat is finished! And I’m thrilled with the results for Vogue Patterns V1467. Have a look! Then scroll down for my comments about this pattern.

(My colleague Frankie Kuschnereit-Perez, McCall Pattern Company website coordinator, is similar in size to the family member I made the jacket for, so I roped her into modeling for me. Thank you, Frankie!)

Vogue Patterns V1467 pea coat as made by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company for the Fall 2015 Sew Along.
Vogue Patterns V1467 pea coat as made by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company for the Fall 2015 Sew Along.
Vogue Patterns V1467 pea coat as made by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company for the Fall 2015 Sew Along.

I have to give a shout-out here to Fabrics & Fabrics in NYC’s garment district for providing the McCall Pattern Company with this beautiful double-faced wool. It is as soft as your blankie from childhood and it was wonderful to sew and press. There is a strong chance I’ll be back to Fabrics & Fabrics soon to buy more double-faced wool for a coat for myself. I highly recommend visiting this store the next time you’re in the city. The service is attentive and they carry a huge selection of the most beautiful designer fabrics. One of my sewing mentors, Susan Khalje, is also a fan of this store.

Vogue Patterns V1467 pea coat as made by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company for the Fall 2015 Sew Along.
Vogue Patterns V1467 pea coat as made by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company for the Fall 2015 Sew Along.

Vogue Patterns V1467 pea coat as made by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company for the Fall 2015 Sew Along.

My general comments about this pattern:

  • I would definitely make a muslin first or do a tissue-fitting. This jacket is meant to have a closer fit than the traditional pea coat design, which was first created for sailors and had a straight silhouette and a more boxy fit. My jacket is a little snugger on Frankie here than it is on the actual recipient. The way it looks on the model in our pattern photo is true to the way it should fit when finished.
  • While you can successfully make this jacket out of heavier wools, as I did, I personally think it works best out of lighter-weight wools. The Anne Klein jacket is made of lightweight wool, in fact. If you do go with a thicker wool like mine, then cut the inside collar band piece from a lighter-weight fabric so it will be easier to stitch when attaching the collar and collar band to the jacket. (Dealing with thick fabrics can get tricky to sew in this area. Ask me how I know.) Also, remember the fit will be snugger when you use a heavier fabric.
  • I was initially reluctant to sew a half lining, because I am a jacket snob and I like a full lining, but I have to admit I really, really like the half lining and Hong Kong seams of this jacket. It looks chic and you don’t have to worry about the lining getting too poufy and bagging out at the jacket hem area. I can see doing this on future jackets I want to sew.
  • When you finish your pea coat, take it to your drycleaner and have them press it for you, even if you think you’ve done a good pressing job. Drycleaners have the equipment to make your handmade garments look like fine ready-to-wear. (The photos here are pre-drycleaner pressing, by the way.)
  • I love two details on this jacket that really make it special: the little inset at the upper back, and the dart at the sleeve cap. Nice touches that will help give your jacket a designer look.

So I give this pattern two thumbs up. I’d actually sew it again, and I rarely sew the same pattern twice. (Except for a ’90s Vogue coat pattern that I’ve made, oh, I think maybe six times already.)

My co-host Rachel wanted to post her pea coat reveal photos today as well, but rain in London has been getting in her way of taking photos she’s happy with. She’s aiming for this Saturday, so pop over to her blog then. In the meantime, check out Lori’s finished pea coat—how great does she look in it?!

Next week I hope to do a Pea Coat Sew Along summary post, with links to every sew along post Rachel and I have done. What are you sewing this weekend? I’m making easy tops right now as a palate cleanser after this pea coat. You know what I mean, right?!

V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along: Buttonholes

V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along, on the McCall Pattern Company blog.It’s the home stretch of our Vogue Patterns V1467 pea coat process. Last week my co-host Rachel went over the hem and other finishing touches on her blog; today I’ll be talking about buttonholes on your pea coat.

Though there are 12 buttons on your jacket—10 on the front and two on the back—you only need to stitch nine buttonholes. That’s five on the right front, two on the inside left front, and two on the left back belt.

Use piece 18 to mark your buttonholes on the right front:

V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along, on the McCall Pattern Company blog.

Mark where you’ll be sewing-on the buttons to the right front (indicated on the tissue by Xs).

You also need to mark the two buttonholes on the inside left jacket front. Piece 18 doesn’t indicate which are the left front buttonholes, but it’s the first and fourth buttonholes you need to mark here. Don’t forget to mark the left back belt too.

V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along, on the McCall Pattern Company blog.

Now you’re ready to sew buttonholes! Use your favorite method for making buttonholes: hand-done, bound, keyhole, etc. If you live in New York City like me, you head to Jonathan Embroidery on W. 38th Street in the Garment District  and have them make your buttonholes for you on their industrial machines. They’re fast and reasonable: Nine buttonholes for $10! I love this place so much.

V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along, on the McCall Pattern Company blog.

Or. sew your own buttonholes. You’ve already stabilized your jacket front in step 1, so you’re good to go. You can either attach the buttonhole foot that came with your machine and follow the directions, or you can stitch them without a special foot. That’s how Tatyana, our head dressmaker and sewer extraordinaire, prefers to do it. Watch her sew a buttonhole in this quick video we shot on our iPhone:

First, set the stitch width to 2.0 and the length to 0.6. Stitch the first long side, stopping with your needle down and on the right. Lift your foot and pivot your fabric 190 degrees.

Change your width to 4.0/5.0 and bar-tack for about 4-5 stitches. Stop again with the needle on the right. Change your width back to 2.0 and stitch the other long side. Stop with the needle down and on the right. Change back to 4.0/5.0, stitch 4-5 bar-tack stitches. Last, set the width to very narrow and stitch a couple of stitches in place to secure the thread. That’s it!

Final step: Adding your buttons. The buttons are a focal point of this jacket, so I think it’s worth spending a few extra dollars here. I got my silver crest shank buttons at M&J Trim, also in the garment district here in NYC. Pricey, but I love how they look against the periwinkle wool of the jacket.

V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along, on the McCall Pattern Company blog.

V1467 Pea Coat Sew Along, on the McCall Pattern Company blog.

The pattern envelope tells you to buy twelve 7/8″ buttons and two 3/4″ buttons; the two smaller buttons go on the inside of the right front facing, so you can use inexpensive, flat buttons here.

Tip: To make sewing on buttons go faster—because seriously, who like to sew on buttons—sew with four strands of thread at the same time. Cut a length of thread that’s about two to three times longer than you usually sew with, then double it. Thread your needle with two threads, pull through and then double again and knot. Now you’re sewing with four strands and you’ve reduced the time to sew on a single button.

Next week: Rachel and I reveal our finished pea coats! How are you coming on yours? Don’t forget to use the hashtag #V1467sewalong.