Finished: Butterick B6421 Brocade Jacket

Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company
Etro coats. Coats 1,3 and 5 are from NeimanMarcus.com; coats 2 and 4 are from Etro.

One of my favorite designers is the Italian brand Etro, which is known for its coats and jackets in beautiful brocade and jacquard prints. There are some consignment shops on the Upper East Side that I haunt regularly looking for an Etro score. In the meantime, I made an Etro tribute coat!

My sewing journey started with two brocades in my stash that I didn’t realize worked well together until Carlos, Vogue Patterns designer, pointed out the obvious to me. One was a black brocade with gold metallic polka dots; the other was a black mini-floral brocade. They are so perfect together: Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

Then Carlos came to the rescue again, suggesting Butterick B6421 for this Etro-like coat I had in mind. I had completely overlooked this pattern, but once you look at the line drawing you can see it’s the way to go if you want to combine two different fabrics:
Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

This jacket went together quickly. The only alterations I made were to narrow the A-line shape a bit at the lower side seams, and to lengthen the bottom panel so I could wear this more as a coat. (I’m also 5’8″ so I tend to have to lengthen patterns.)

Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

For an Etro-like touch, I stitched some grosgrain ribbon atop the horizontal seams.
Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

The inside is lined with China silk. I edged the facing with black satin piping I made.
Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

I’m really pleased with my Etro/Carlos coat. I like the fact that I can wear it fall through spring, and that you can dress it up or down. This is a great pattern for using up small pieces of fabric in your stash. You could even try mixing up to four different fabrics—just make sure they’re all of similar weight.

Next up: Honestly, I don’t know what I want to make next. January and February are months where I’m never sure if I want to stick with sewing for winter, or just give up and move on to spring sewing. What are you working on?

Finished: Butterick Lisette Moto Jacket. Plus, Wrap Dress Sewalong

Butterick B6169 Lisette Moto Jacket pattern as sewn by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company

My Butterick B6169 Lisette jacket is finished and I’m really, really happy with it. In fact, this jacket gets full credit for restoring my sewing mojo. You see, I’d made several garments in a row that were total wadders, and I was beginning to despair. I’d lost my touch! But this one turned out to be a happy marriage of pattern, fabric and fit, so all’s right in sewing land once again.

Did you know that Liesl Gibson, designer of Lisette patterns for Butterick, is currently hosting a sewalong of this pattern? She just started it on Monday, so grab your fabric and pattern and join in. I have to hand it to Liesl—she designed a great pattern. It’s very well drafted and I think it can be easily tweaked to fit most body types.

Here are more photos of my jacket:

Butterick B6169 Lisette Moto Jacket pattern as sewn by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company
Front view, half zipped. You will note that this dress form (a sample size 10) is way smaller than I am, so the jacket looks a little baggier here than it is on me. It has a semi-fitted, slightly boxy shape.
Butterick B6169 Lisette Moto Jacket pattern as sewn by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company. Back view
Back view. Love the seaming here, and I especially love the two-piece sleeve. I like this pattern’s sleeve shape so much I may borrow it for future jackets.
Butterick B6169 Lisette Moto Jacket pattern as sewn by Meg Carter of the McCall Pattern Company. Lining view.
The lining. Pink makes a nice contrast, right? Our instructions tell you to insert the lining the couture way, which I followed and am pleased with the results. But in Liesl’s sewalong she’ll show you how to move a little faster by bagging-out the lining. Check it out.

Because I know you’re going to ask, the fabric is a mid-weight cotton (and silk?) from Trumart Fabrics near FIT in NYC. Supposedly it’s by Alexander Wang. I bought this a few months ago, so I doubt there’s any left but you can give them a call.

 

Wrap Dress Sewalong: How are you coming with your wrap dresses? If you working on the bodice, my co-host Lucinda’s post about making a small-bust adjustment for your wrap dress is available here. If you’re looking for info on how to make a full-bust adjustment, that’s available from Gorgeous Fabrics here.

Small bust adjustment, the McCall Pattern Company Wrap Dress Sewalong
Lucinda shows you how to make a small bust adjustment that prevents gaping in her blog post.

My own wrap dress is coming along pretty well. I’ve been in production-mode sewing the last couple of nights, which means I’m not really following the order of the instructions but doing all the seam work first. Rather than fuss with the bodice facing details before moving on to the next section, I put that temporarily aside to sew all the seams of the bodice, skirt and sleeves. Straight seams make for fast and easy sewing, right? I caught up on the episodes of Empire I missed while I did this sewing. And can I just say: Cookie!!!

Feel free to leave a comment here reporting on your wrap dress progress. Everything going ok? Any stumbling blocks? Don’t forget to use the hashtag #wrapdresssewalong and to post your pix on our Flickr board.

 

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