Finished: Butterick B6421 Brocade Jacket

Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company
Etro coats. Coats 1,3 and 5 are from NeimanMarcus.com; coats 2 and 4 are from Etro.

One of my favorite designers is the Italian brand Etro, which is known for its coats and jackets in beautiful brocade and jacquard prints. There are some consignment shops on the Upper East Side that I haunt regularly looking for an Etro score. In the meantime, I made an Etro tribute coat!

My sewing journey started with two brocades in my stash that I didn’t realize worked well together until Carlos, Vogue Patterns designer, pointed out the obvious to me. One was a black brocade with gold metallic polka dots; the other was a black mini-floral brocade. They are so perfect together: Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

Then Carlos came to the rescue again, suggesting Butterick B6421 for this Etro-like coat I had in mind. I had completely overlooked this pattern, but once you look at the line drawing you can see it’s the way to go if you want to combine two different fabrics:
Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

This jacket went together quickly. The only alterations I made were to narrow the A-line shape a bit at the lower side seams, and to lengthen the bottom panel so I could wear this more as a coat. (I’m also 5’8″ so I tend to have to lengthen patterns.)

Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

For an Etro-like touch, I stitched some grosgrain ribbon atop the horizontal seams.
Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

The inside is lined with China silk. I edged the facing with black satin piping I made.
Butterick B6421 brocade jacket as made by Meg Carter of McCall Pattern Company

I’m really pleased with my Etro/Carlos coat. I like the fact that I can wear it fall through spring, and that you can dress it up or down. This is a great pattern for using up small pieces of fabric in your stash. You could even try mixing up to four different fabrics—just make sure they’re all of similar weight.

Next up: Honestly, I don’t know what I want to make next. January and February are months where I’m never sure if I want to stick with sewing for winter, or just give up and move on to spring sewing. What are you working on?