Royal Wedding Sew-Along: Construction Process Continues

royal wedding sew-along
Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images

Hi guys! After a little break for last week’s holiday weekend we’re back on track with the Royal Wedding Sew-Along. We’re still in the middle of constructing our outfits but that’s ok. The wedding isn’t until May 19th so we’ve got time. Let’s check in with our sew-along blogging team: 

Brittany is working on sewing and attaching the skirt  this week in her blog post. She’s making Butterick B5850.#royalweddingsewalong

Rachel is making some fun pattern hacks, modifying her dress pattern into a jumpsuit . She’s making Simplicity 8292.

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Lindsey has a video tutorial on unlined skirts, pleats, and blind hems. She’s sewing New Look 6526.#royalweddingsewalong

Allie, who’s making McCall’s M7684, is also working on her skirt this week.#royalweddingsewalong

Monica is waiting for her fabric to arrive before she writes her next post. She is sewing Vogue Patterns V9292.
 

Just a quick note to emphasize again that participation in the Royal Wedding Sew-Along is not limited to these five patterns. In fact, you can sew in the sew-along and enter the contest (details coming soon) as long as you’re making a CURRENT pattern from Butterick, McCall’s, New Look, Simplicity or Vogue Patterns.

Have you joined our Royal Wedding Sew-Along Facebook group yet? It’s the best place to meet your fellow sew-alongers and share your progress. And don’t forget to use the hashtag #royalweddingsewalong when you share on social media. More next week and a contest. Stay tuned!

Royal Wedding Sew-Along: Construction Process

royalweddingsewalong
Karwai Tang/WireImage

Hi Royal Wedding Sew-Alongers! We’re into the first part of the construction phase of the sew-along, but don’t worry if you haven’t started sewing yet. This is a go-at-your-own-pace sew-along. All content will be available indefinitely,

On the blogs and YouTube channels of the Royal Wedding Sew-Along bloggers this week:

Allie, who’s making McCall’s M7684, has all sorts of tips for making perfect darts in her blog post this week.

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Allie’s steps to a beautiful bodice.

Brittany also concentrates on bodice darts this week in her blog post. She’s making Butterick B5850.

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Brittany has lots of pointers for perfect dart-making.

Lindsey has a video tutorial that’s great for beginning sewers who might need some tips on how to best place and cut out their pattern pieces. She’s sewing New Look 6526.

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Check out Lindsey’s video for tips on laying out your pattern.

Monica is sewing Vogue Patterns V9292. She’s a huge fan of washable markers for her sewing projects.

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Have you tried washable markers yet for your sewing projects?

Rachel has a video tutorial on fitting this week. She’s making Simplicity 8292.

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Getting the fit right with Rachel this week.

 

Just a quick note to emphasize again that participation in the Royal Wedding Sew-Along is not limited to these five patterns. In fact, you can sew in the sew-along and enter the contest (details coming soon) as long as you’re making a CURRENT pattern from Butterick, McCall’s, New Look, Simplicity or Vogue Patterns.

Have you joined our Royal Wedding Sew-Along Facebook group yet? It’s the best place to meet your fellow sew-alongers and share your progress. We also just started a Royal Wedding Sew-Along Pinterest board; be sure and follow that. And don’t forget to use the hashtag #royalweddingsewalong when you share on social media. Next week we’ll have more on the construction process. Stay tuned!

Royal Wedding Sew-Along: Making A Muslin/Toile

Tim Rooke/Shutterstock

Hi everyone! This week on the Royal Wedding Sew-along we’re making muslins, or toiles as they’re known in some parts of the world. A muslin is a test garment you make out of inexpensive fabric (or muslin fabric, hence the name). This test garment allows you to check the fit and make any adjustments before you cut into your more expensive fashion fabric. Personally, I’ve never regretted taking a few extra hours to make a muslin. It’s always paid off with a final garment that fits and looks exactly how I wanted it to.

So let’s see what our Royal Wedding Sew-Along bloggers have to say about making muslins: 

Brittany says she rarely makes muslins, but after making one for her Butterick dress and liking the alterations she made because of it, she plans on making more muslins in the future. Read Brittany’s post here.

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Brittany made adjustments to her back darts after making a muslin.

Monica learned from her Vogue Patterns muslin that she wants to add some length and use an invisible zipper. We love that she wore a fascinator for her muslin photos! Read Monica’s post here.

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Monica used muslin fabric from Jo-Ann’s for her test dress.

Allie tackled the fit and muslin process in two blog posts this week. Her photos documenting the steps she took to get the McCall’s bodice fit just right are really helpful. Read Allie’s posts here

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Allie’s final muslin for her bodice.

Lindsey did a video that shows how she determines which pattern size to use and how she got the fit of her New Look bodice just right. Watch her video here.

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Lindsey’s video for her New Look dress

Rachel’s post is coming soon!

Have you joined our Royal Wedding Sew-Along Facebook group yet? It’s the best place to meet your fellow sew-alongers and share your progress. We also just started a Royal Wedding Sew-Along Pinterest board; be sure and follow that. And don’t forget to use the hashtag #royalweddingsewalong when you share on social media. Next week we start the construction process. Stay tuned!