Summer, Must You Go So Soon?

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I know, we technically still have a few more days of summer left. But once we get past Labor Day here in the US and all the kiddos go back to school, it feels like another summer streaked past us before we even knew it was here. Sigh.

To cheer us up, let’s look at some photos—a mashup of #mancandymonday and #throwbackthursday. In 1978 we traveled to Antigua to shoot these photos for Vogue Patterns Magazine. Love it. Scroll down for more photos.

Miscellaneous stuff:

  • Been reading all your blog post comments as have many other members of the McCall’s team. You guys give helpful feedback; please keep it up.
  • Planning a Pinterest contest; details to come soon.
  • What do you think of the Ralph Rucci coat pattern (V1419) for a sewalong? There seems to be the most reader support for that pattern. If you want to sew a coat but not that particular pattern, check out a new Craftsy class that teaches you how to sew Vogue Patterns coat V9040.
  • Anyone going to the American Sewing Expo in September? We’ll be there in booth #420; please stop by and say hello!
  • We’re also sponsoring the Sewing Party on November 8. Read more about this cool sewing event here.
  • So glad you liked our Fall Collection video! Planning another one as we speak.

Spread from a 1978 Vogue Patterns Magazine issue

Spread from a 1978 Vogue Patterns Magazine issue

Spread from a 1978 Vogue Patterns Magazine issue

Spread from a 1978 Vogue Patterns Magazine issue

Have a great Labor Day weekend and here’s to a fantastic fall together!

Behind the Scenes: Vogue Designer Patterns

Vogue Pattern V1416 by Guy Laroche.

Today we’d like to talk about the designer patterns for Vogue Patterns, specifically to clear up a common misperception that often appears online in blog posts and discussion threads. True or false: The models in the Vogue Patterns designer patterns are wearing the actual designer garments.

Give yourself a pat on the back if you answered true. The models in the product photography are indeed wearing the actual designer garments as supplied by the designers. We don’t remake these designer patterns using our own fabrics, nor do we alter the garments’ designs in any way. The designer labels are intact and very often the original price tags are still hanging from them.

Model wearing an actual Tom and Linda Platt top. Voge Patterns V1415.
Model wearing an actual Tom and Linda Platt top. V1415.

Some designers, like Ralph Rucci, will supply the patterns for us to use when we translate their designs for home sewers. If we don’t have a pattern from the designer to start with, our patternmaking team will study the garment very closely so we can replicate it as exactly as possible.

Ralph Rucci pattern pieces used by Vogue Patterns to create one of his designer sewing patterns.
A Ralph Rucci pattern, as supplied by the designer.

Every now and then we’ll see online discussions comparing a designer runway photo with the same designer pattern, and if there are differences between the two garments people  assume we altered the garment for our home sewing market. Not so at all. Designers frequently modify their runway garments for the RTW market—changing a hemline or fabric, for example—if they feel that will broaden a garment’s appeal. But we don’t alter the garments that come from the designers who allow us to license their clothes.

We hope this clears up this common misperception about how we create Vogue Patterns from designers. Let us know if you found this post informative and if there are other questions you may have about our designer patterns. We may feature them in future posts!

We Entertained!

Group blogger selfie at the McCall Pattern Company Open House and Trunk Show event.

This Tuesday we hosted an open house and trunk show for a small group of NYC-area bloggers, sewing educators, sewing writers, and sewing fans. First we took everybody on a tour of our headquarters, showing them everything from the patternmaking department to the photo studio. Then we gave them a mini trunk show of the garments from our fall pattern lines, including several pieces from the latest Vogue Patterns collection. After that, we all gathered in our fabric library for mingling and talking about our favorite things—sewing and patterns!

We had such a good time hosting this event that we’re considering holding a few trunk shows around the country. But the next place you’ll definitely see us is at the American Sewing Expo in September. We have a booth and are sponsoring a number of events. Hope to see you there!

Photo from McCall Pattern Company's open house & trunk show, July 2014.
Mingling in the Fabric Library.
Photo from McCall Pattern Company's open house & trunk show, July 2014.
We love that so many guests wore our patterns!
Photo from McCall Pattern Company's open house & trunk show, July 2014.
Getting a closer look at Vogue Pattern 8991 jacket by Claire Shaeffer.
Frank Rizzo, president and CEO of the McCall Pattern Company, welcoming guests.
Frank Rizzo, president and CEO of the McCall Pattern Company, welcoming guests.
photo from the McCall Pattern Company Open House & Trunk Show, July 2014.
Vogue Patterns Magazine editor Kathy Marrone showing guests the muslin for V9040 coat, as part of her talk on the steps to making a pattern.
Melissa Watson, McCall pattern designer, explaining her design process to guests at McCall's open house and trunk show.
Melissa Watson, one of McCall’s licensees, explaining her design process and how she works with McCall’s.
Guests at McCall's open house touring the NYC headquarters.
Walking through the patternmaking area at McCall’s.
Guests at the McCall Pattern Company open house & trunk show.
Group shot in our photo studio. Loved having these people here!