Sewing velvet: patterns. On the McCall Pattern Company blogLast week we talked about how to sew velvet without collapsing into a puddle of sewing misery. This week we’ve got suggestions regarding which patterns are best for velvet first-time sewers. Keeping it simple is key.

But first, let’s take a look at a velvet wrap top I just made. I used an out-of-print Kwik Sew pattern from my stash, but you could get a similar look with Butterick B6176 or McCall’s M7200. As I hadn’t sewn velvet in years, my plan was to choose a pattern on the really simple side. I wanted to concentrate on mastering velvet, and not get hung up on pattern details like fit, collars, darts, extra seams, etc. This Kwik Sew pattern had only shoulder and side seams, and a front/neck facing:

velvet wrap top sewn by Meg Carter. As seen on the McCall Pattern Company blog.

Tip: Before you hem sleeves or other parts, let your velvet garment hang for 24 hours or more. The front lower corners of my wrap top would not drape properly, so I tucked little weights inside the facing and just let the top hang for about 48 hours. This did the trick. For more tips on working with velvet, watch this video we made.

VELVET TOPS

Inspiration:

Suggested patterns:

Any of these patterns would work in velvet for first-timers because they have few details. For the Butterick pattern (center) I’d eliminate the elastic casings at the sleeve and bodice hem. I’m personally thinking of making the Vogue pattern (left) in black velvet.

VELVET PANTS

Inspiration:

Suggested patterns:

You can’t walk into a store these days without seeing pair after pair of velvet pants. The look is either wide leg or track pants, and these two patterns are well suited. Make things easy on yourself and go for an elastic waist.

VELVET DRESSES

Inspiration:

Suggested patterns:

First-time sewers of velvet should definitely opt for something more like the inspiration dress on the left—just a little shift dress. I’d use B5948 and extend it to make it dress-length. If you want more details and have previously sewn a shirtdress, try M6885, but make the collar and placket out of satin rather than velvet. Satin here will be much easier to work with than velvet.

VELVET JACKETS

Inspiration:

Suggested patterns:

A velvet kimono is a great layering piece and you can dress it up or down. Plus, it’s easy to sew! Feel free to tackle a velvet bomber jacket if you’ve sewn a bomber jacket before and are up for a little more of a challenge. You may want to size up on the McCall’s pattern as it has a slim fit.

So, have we given you enough ammunition to sew velvet this season? I don’t know about you but I’m hooked on this fabric! What’s next on your must-make list?

 

Velvet: sewing patterns that are perfect for first-time sewers of that tricky fabric, velvet.