Inside Peek: Vogue Patterns Designer Kimono Jacket

Vogue Patterns V1493 kimono jacket sewing pattern by Koos van den Akker. As seen on the McCall Pattern Company blog.

Vogue Patterns V1493 kimono jacket by Koos van den Akker is one of our bestselling patterns right now. With so many of you planning to make this pattern, we thought it might be helpful to share some tips and photos of the actual designer garment.

Tip #1: Choose your pattern size based on how much ease you want in your kimono jacket. If you want a decent amount of ease and a roomy fit, then I’d recommend going with your normal Vogue Patterns size. I wanted less ease in my kimono jacket (I’m sewing this too!) so I chose to cut a smaller size in this pattern than I normally sew. I’m very happy with the fit. But ease is a personal thing, so do what’s right for you.

Tip #2: This kimono jacket also looks great as is, without the floral appliqués and crisscrossing ribbons. My fabric is some kind of rayon blend jacquard in seafoam, with a tone-on-tone raised japonaise motif. I consulted with our design team here and was advised to keep it simple. (Translation: I walked into Carlos’s office, showed him my fabric swatch, and asked “yes or no to the ribbons and appliqués.” He took one look and said no, and I thanked him for saving me a lot of time.)

Tip #3: The original designer jacket is made of a textured, medium-weight rayon fabric—it’s more substantial than you might suspect. The design works in lighter fabrics too, but I think those tulip-banded sleeves will hang just a tad better in medium-weight, drapey fabrics.

Ok, now let’s take a closer look at the original designer jacket:

Vogue Patterns V1493 kimono jacket sewing pattern by Koos van den Akker. As seen on the McCall Pattern Company blog.
The pocket and the side vents. You can choose to finish the seams however you like, but don’t they look chic as Hong Kong seams?
Vogue Patterns V1493 kimono jacket sewing pattern by Koos van den Akker. As seen on the McCall Pattern Company blog.
The shoulder and sleeve area, inside jacket view.
Vogue Patterns V1493 kimono jacket sewing pattern by Koos van den Akker. As seen on the McCall Pattern Company blog.
Front band showing the stitched-on bias bands.

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Are you sewing this jacket? How’s it going? I’ve sewn everything up to the sleeves, but have to put it aside this weekend to make a quick baby quilt. More to come!

We’ve been sewing since 1863.

25 comments
  1. I gotta decide on/find an appropriate fabric first! How do you think this pattern would translate in a Linen?

    1. Hi Grace! Yes, we do recommend linen for this.

  2. Koos van den Akker passed away recently (last year). Just curious, is this one of his last designs or is this particular design from someone who has stepped in to continue his design line.

    1. Hi Tomasa! This jacket was done by his team after his death, but it’s very much in his vision.

  3. This jacket is gorgeous. It isn’t my usual style, but I plan to make it up soon.

  4. The kimono jacket is so on trend, beautiful versions pass me on the street daily and they all have that ‘arty’ flair. I might just have to have a go at this one. Looking forward to seeing yours Meg.

  5. I procrastinated a good long time before I finally decided to order this pattern because of the sewing rating. I deciding to challenge myself and hopefully improve my sewing skills this year. I will take it one step at a time and look at the instructions’s illustrations carefully as I sew and oh, let’s not forget the wonders of a muslin!

  6. Just wondering about the fusible used on the applique – would SAS Lite work in the by-the-yard put up? Still thinking about whether to tackle this or not. I do love the style. I also love the look of the Hong Kong finishing on the inside.

    1. Yes that’s what was used. Appliques cut from chiffon!

      1. If the appliques are cut from chiffon, do they need to be edge-finished first to stop them from fraying? Or is it enough to fuse them to the fusible backing? I read somewhere that Koos actually just glued on his appliques and then quilt-stitched them afterwards. The design is lovely but looks difficult to execute. Thanks.

        1. The jacket is actually not hard to sew at all. Fussing with appliqués may take some time, but the actual construction isn’t difficult at all.

  7. Wow! This is awesome work. Your finished seams are perfection. Great job!

    1. Hi Anita! Wish I could take credit but these photos are of the original Koos van den Akker jacket.

  8. I keep drooling over this pattern! Would it work in a ponte that rather stable?

    1. Hi Sue! I think if the ponte is on the lightweight side, yes, it could work.

  9. Was the bias binding put on the inside seams before the jacket was put together or after ?

    1. Hi Suzi! Generally binding is applied after each seam is completed and before moving on to the next step in construction.

  10. I have just purchased this pattern and am really getting excited about it. I’l flat pattern measure before deciding on the ease I want. I LOVE this design. The Koos original is beautifully finished inside. One thing caught my eye. In the pattern the pocket is secured to the hem edge to prevent it from moving. I don’t see that in the original. I am curious if he had a different approach to securing the pocket or was it left “hanging”. You know I always want to know how the designer does it! Thanks, Meg.

    1. Hi Bunny! The original designer jacket is now on its way to Puyallup, WA, for the show, so I can’t go inspect it. But our directions for designer re-creations generally are faithful to how the designer constructed it. So my guess is that’s what the Koos team did when they first made it. Hope this helps!

  11. Thanks, Meg! Hope you get to go to Puyallup, too!

  12. Hi Meg, I too love this Kimono. I want to take you up on your offer to give me some suggestions for a remnant I bought just because it was so gorgeous. Now, I’m looking for a way to use it. Do you think it would look good with Vogue Patterns V1493 kimono jacket? Or, would it look better as a long or short skirt? The remnant is only 2 yards by 54″. 50 years ago I knew my way around a sewing machine. Now I just hot glue everything together. This is my admission that I no longer remember much of anything about sewing. I planned to buy only a small amount, then to use it as a band on my hat. This remnant is probably intended as drapery fabric, but Scarlet O’Hara”gave us permission to use drapes for ballgowns, etc. I wish I could send you a photo of the fabric, but I’ll try to describe it. It has a backing—cream colored that is some sheer synthetic. The front consists of rows of rosettes made out of narrow ribbon swirled around in a circle to look like a rose. Each rose is about 3″ x 3″. They overlap slightly so they fill the entire surface of the material. The ribbon is iridescent pale gold fading into ivory and is edged in black thread to give the rosettes a definite shape. It looks heavy, but is actually quite light. This would make a sensational evening gown if I were young and svelte as I was 50 yrs ago, but now I am a fireplug with drooping boobs and lymphedema arms due to a bout with breast cancer 17 years ago that I won. I took some pictures of the fabric and put them in my Dropbox so if you wish to see what it looks like, follow this link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ytt19a3pk6d4mcg/AAAj9iov13IpyjWFCLFHTs4ka?dl=0. Sorry this took so long to explain, but I do need suggestions. Thanks so much!

    1. Hi Mary! Lovely fabric. I would choose a pattern with very simple lines, the better to show off this fabric. If you like the kimono shape, and who doesn’t, try Butterick B6176: https://butterick.mccall.com/b6176. Good luck!

      1. Thanks so much, Meg. That was actually one of the patterns I was considering until I saw the Vogue one. But it does look a lot easier. Thank you again.

  13. Hello Meg
    Perhaps I’m looking in the wrong place, but I can’t find where you’ve blogged about the rest of this jacket.
    I was hoping to see more details of how you attached the lower and upper sleeves together at the point. MIn has a huge pucker despite following the instructions. I can’t see how it is to be made flat, like the original design.

    1. Hi Julie! I did not write a tutorial for this jacket, and it’s been so long since I made it. For help, you could email consumerservice@mccallpatterncompany.com or call 1-800-782-0323, Mon-Fri 8:30-4:30 ET. Good luck! I know you can do it!

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